2019 Year End Wrap-Up

Another year, another favorites of the year blog entry.   I know it’s been quite a while since my last post (about a year, actually) and I don’t know if I’ll be returning to more frequent posting again, but  I can’t resist making lists. Lists, wonderful and succulent lists! Okay, moving on… These are the…

Bruce Springsteen and Nihilistic Vase Smashing

Even the most professional and assured musicians have goofy moments from their early years. Though Bruce Springsteen is one of the most focused and driven artists in the history of rock music, teenage Bruce was still soaking it all in and trying to find his own musical identity, and sometimes…um, not quite succeeding, as he…

Of Refrigerators, Trunks, Tuning Forks, and Marbles

The most expensive box set ever released is actually a refrigerator. $100,000 for a refrigerator full of music and memorabilia from 40+ year old cult band The Residents – but it’s a refrigerator all the same. The most surprising thing about the box set is that it sold.  In September, a man going by the…

Similar Ingredients [#5] – William Tyler/Bruce Springsteen

Songs with certain similarities – either musical, lyrical, historical, cultural, and/or all of these things. =”A Portrait of Sarah” (by William Tyler) 2013= Tyler is one of the new breed of fleet-fingered instrumental guitarists rooted in the “Takoma school” of playing (Leo Kottke, John Fahey, etc.).  His latest album, Impossible Truth, is full of spacious…

Similar Ingredients [#4] – Kings of Leon/Bruce Springsteen

Songs with certain similarities – either musical, lyrical, historical, cultural, and/or all of these things. =”Supersoaker” (by Kings of Leon) 2013= Take some Lynyrd Skynyrd, with a dash of Allman Brothers, a dollop of Thin Lizzy, a couple of tablespoons of Bruce Springsteen and mix ’em up with an ounce of U2-style guitar.  U2-style guitar?…

Jackson Browne’s “Linda Paloma”: A California Mexican Song

“At the moment the music began and you heard the guitar player starting to sing…” With this opening line, Jackson Browne directly invites the listener in to his 1976 song “Linda Paloma”. It’s a song unlike anything else in Browne’s catalog, and not just due to the music. While he’s known for writing subject matter…